Period_Talk_Dad_Conversation_Blog_Post

When a young girl prepares to start her period, there are many common misconceptions that may bring about discomfort or stress. Today, we’re here to debunk one of those common myths: that dads are somehow not equipped or shouldn’t be involved in the development of their daughters. We’re here to tell you that this just isn’t the case! And better yet, when a father is truly invested in this stage of his daughter’s life – both sides will benefit. But listen up, dads: if you wait for the moment that your daughter approaches you about the subject, you may be waiting a long time. It’s important that dads realize the role they will play in this stage of their daughter’s lives, and how to approach this time with honesty, love, and support.

When a dad openly communicates with his daughter about her period, he’s doing more than having a conversation. He’s telling her that what’s happening to her body is nothing to be ashamed of, and it’s just one more stage in her development that is totally normal. This type of message is so important, and hearing it from her dad will make a huge difference. For far too long, girls and women have been told that periods are something to hide or be embarrassed by.

So, dad, if you’re still feeling a little nervous to approach the subject, that’s okay. Just know that whatever stress you’re feeling is most likely amplified in your daughter’s mind, and you have the power to alleviate that stress. That’s a pretty worthy cause, right? Put in the effort and the time to get educated and prepared; she’s worth it. Below, we’re sharing some of our best tips to do just that:

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Monthly Mission - dads and daughters

Dads can teach us how to tie our shoes, ride a bike, and drive a car. If we’re lucky, our fathers play an important role in many of the milestones of our lives, starting in childhood. But all too often, when it comes to menstrual health and development, a father’s place can become a little less clear. There may be embarrassment, shame, or confusion on both sides – and this can lead to a breakdown in important communication between a daughter and the invaluable support that only her father can provide. As young girls begin to develop, they may start to pull away or naturally try to hide these changes from their dads. The truth is, a dad’s role in this stage is just as important as remembering to put on her helmet before he sends her off on her bike. When a father participates in this formative stage of his daughter’s life, instead of letting her mom handle it, this signifies to the daughter that he accepts her, and will love her as she grows and changes. Because, listen up, dad: this is about way more than momentary discomfort. This is about arming your daughter with the confidence she needs to take on the world, knowing you’ve got her back. And that type of confidence? It only comes with massive amounts of open communication, love, and support.

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Monthly Mission - share your story #periodtalk

 

Is there anything more powerful than the two words, “Me too”? It’s such a seemingly simple sentence, but it holds amazing power to connect people despite their differences. There are many reasons for this, but when it comes down to it, connecting with other people just makes you feel good.

As women, it is so important that we share our stories out loud. So often, we let our busy schedules, our lives, or even our shame separate us from other people. Let’s put a stop to the fear that keeps us from sharing. We’re here to tell you:

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How to insert a tampon

 

Looking for a disposable feminine hygiene option to help you stay on the go during your flow?

If you’ve been considering making the switch from pads to tampons, or are wondering how to talk an adolescent through the ins and outs of inner wear, we have some no-nonsense info to get you started. We’ve broken it down into helpful sections so that you can scroll right to the info you need the most!Read More… >>


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By Cathy Chapman

 

When it comes to talking to your parents about menstrual care options it definitely helps to know the facts. Menstrual cups are not a new concept – In fact, they have been around for about 150 years. However, still many people may not be familiar with the concept of them. Here are some tips for talking your parents (or anyone, really) about menstrual cups!

how to talk to your parent about menstrual cupsFirst of all, What IS the menstrual cup? (The quick and friendly version.)

Menstrual cups are reusable menstrual care protection. Worn internally like tampons, they differ in that they are designed to collect menstrual flow rather than absorb it. They are safe, easy to use, and a hygienic alternative to pads and tampons!

 

Now that we have that over with….
It helps to make a list of reasons why you’re interested in menstrual cups. Points to note could be…

• The average person spends about $48-84 per year on disposable menstrual products. Menstrual cups can be a one time cost that will last for years.

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By Robyn Srigley, BA, PTS, CNP, NNCP

 

Periods are confusing. One day you are barely flowin’ and the next you’re changing your tampon every few hours. And don’t even get me started on the cramps and cravings! What gives? Well, depending on the colour and level of flow we superwomen are experiencing, there could be any number of things going on. Decode the mystery below.

How heavy is your flow

(check out the full infographic, here)

 

Light Flow
This could be one of two things. Either you’re near the beginning or the end of your regular period, or you’re not having a true period at all and are just spotting. So how do you tell the difference?Read More… >>


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Move over toxic tampons. Take a hike, sweaty pads. There’s a new player in town and it looks like she’s here to stay – 12 hours at a time. It seems women are going crazy for the menstrual cup, a reusable, bell-shaped silicone device inserted into the vagina to collect menstrual blood, and they’re taking it to the web with countless YouTube videos, blog posts and tweets praising its benefits. So what’s all this commotion about?

 

menstrual cup revolutionThroughout its surprisingly long history (early versions of the menstrual cup were patented as far back as in 1932!), the menstrual cup has not been a popular option for period care. Despite several attempts to launch the product in mass markets over the years, it was never able to compete with disposable tampons and sanitary pads. Although it is still a foreign concept to most women, the menstrual cup is slowly claiming its place in mainstream markets. It is no longer a mysterious apparatus only found in natural health stores; the product is now available in some major drugstores and can be easily bought online. An increasing selection of brands is also popping up worldwide: from Lunette, to Mooncup, Meluna, Yuuki, Fleurcup, Sckoon, Ruby, Femmecup and The DivaCup – to name but few.

 

Diva International Inc., the makers of The DivaCup, one of North America’s most popular menstrual cup brands with over 1 million cups sold to date, have definitely noticed the new trend. For the past 10 years, DivaCup International’s sales have been growing at double digit rates. “In the past ten years we have received great enthusiasm and acceptance around The DivaCup in both natural health and more recently, mainstream markets,” says a spokesperson for The DivaCup.

 

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Say it again

Last fall I had a conversation about menstruation with my then two-year-old daughter. I didn’t want to; I was forced. Some were amused by its content. Some inspired.

Just the other night, the topic of periods came up again. Because I was having mine, and once again my daughter saw the string between my legs.

What is a Period, MommyThe conversation started off exactly like the first time, but ended up going in a different, more detailed direction…

“Somefeen in your butt, Mommy.”

“We had this conversation before, honey. Do you remember? There is nothing in my butt. It’s in my vagina, and it’s called a tampon.”

A look of recognition came across her face, and she nodded as if to say she remembered. And then she was quiet for a moment. I thought I was getting off easy this time. But…

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Handling Periods at School - Tips for Parents and Girls

 

For many young girls, one of the most deeply rooted menstruation fears is to rise up from their desk at school only to have accidentally leaked all over their clothes – for everyone in their class to see.

While this fear is diminished with time and experience, it is an absolutely normal and natural feeling for most girls who are menstruating to worry while they are at school.

Truth is, even adults worry about this, and it would be rare for any woman to choose to wear white pants, or a skirt – or any other clothing that would easily show blood should a pad or tampon malfunction.

Put it this way, females of all ages, have been wearing jackets wrapped around their waists, black pants and tunics during their periods for decades in order to find some peace of mind that their ‘private’ time of the month will remain just that.  Private!

For this reason, and because plenty of girls experience cramps, diarrhea or other ‘issues’ during their period, combined with the fact that schools can be insensitive to the insecurities and fears of menstruating girls, many females choose to simply just stay out of school for a day or two during menstruation.  And this too can become a problem.

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Toxic Shock Syndrome ImgAmy Elifritz was age 20, menstruating and using tampons, when she came down with what appeared to be the flu.  She died four days later from Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS).  After Amy’s death, her mother, Lisa, founded You ARE Loved, a nonprofit that raises awareness about tampon related Toxic Shock Syndrome and provides factual menstrual information.

Since launching the You ARE Loved website, we have received and posted several stories of girls and young women who developed tampon related TSS in recent years: Sarah and Brittany, both age 15 – Alex, age 16 – Katelyn, 17 – Amanda, 19 – Lauren, 20 – Nikki, who died of TSS at 21 – Shenikwa, a college student – Heather, a new mom….

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